Recent Press Releases

Prairieland Youth Leadership Conference awards $12,000 in scholarships

13 February 2024

The annual Prairieland Youth Leadership Conference, held on February 3 and 4, 2024, was a huge success, with over...

Learn More

Prairieland Agriculture’s newest youth competition a huge success!

13 February 2024

Prairieland Junior Ag Showcase, in conjunction with the University of Saskatchewan Judging Team, presented the first-ever Dare To Judge...

Learn More

Crop show maintains industry leadership

15 January 2024

The recently concluded Western Canadian Crop Production Show, presented by Farm Credit Canada, showcased its unwavering leadership in the...

Learn More

From seeds to success

10 January 2024

In 1983, a visionary idea took root and has since flourished into an annual pilgrimage to Saskatoon for prairie...

Learn More

The perfect holiday party this season

22 November 2023

When the holidays come around, we think about the family and friends we love spending time with. Hosting a...

Learn More

Important audio-visual requirements for a showstopper event

1 November 2023

Once upon a time, in the not-too-distant past, a clean room with a lectern and microphone were the key...

Learn More

Prairieland Youth Leadership Conference awards $12,000 in scholarships

The annual Prairieland Youth Leadership Conference, held on February 3 and 4, 2024, was a huge success, with over 30 aspiring young leaders in agriculture competing for scholarships and developing their leadership skills throughout the weekend.

The conference was held at the World Trade Center Saskatoon at Prairieland and was packed with interactive activities, competitions, and workshops. The event started on Saturday, February 3, and came to an end on Sunday, February 4, with an awards banquet, where parents joined for dinner and scholarship presentation. The conference included a presentation from Jolene Watson of Clarity Coaching & Development. She provided participants with valuable insight on charismatic leadership focusing on communication style, leadership strategies, and effective listening.

Participants were divided into groups and tasked with formulating a debate on topics relevant to their lives, including voting age in Canada and grass-fed versus grain-fed beef. On Sunday morning, the groups went head-to-head while presenting their supporting evidence on their appointed topic and displayed rebuttals that exemplified the effective listening skills discussed
in their Saturday presentation.

Four judges were challenged to mark participants’ assignments and activities by observing them in a team situation as they worked. Here are the results:

First place and a $4,500 scholarship: Katelynn T., West PA 4-H Beef Club
Second place and a $3,000 scholarship: Shelby P., Saskatoon 4-H Beef Club
Third place and a $2,500 scholarship: Mara V., Springside 4-H Beef Club
Fourth place and a $1000 scholarship: Nicole W., Old Bone Trail Multiple 4-H Club
Fifth place and a $1,000 scholarhsip: Aiva B., Candiac 4-H Beef Club

Prairieland is proud to support youth in agriculture, and we extend our thanks to volunteers, staff, and sponsors who made the event possible.

Link to this Story

Prairieland Agriculture’s newest youth competition a huge success!

Prairieland Junior Ag Showcase, in conjunction with the University of Saskatchewan Judging Team, presented the first-ever Dare To Judge youth agriculture competition on January 26-28, 2024. The Prairieland Ag Center was host to over 75 participants and spectators over the weekend.

Dare To Judge began on Friday, January 26, with the Judging Clinic, followed by the Saskatoon Regional 4-H Judging Competition qualifying event and the University of Saskatchewan Judging Team’s Annual Collegiate Judging Competition on Saturday, January 27. “Prairieland Agriculture was pleased to launch Dare To Judge and co-host this new competition with the University of Saskatchewan Judging Team,” said Prairieland Park Agriculture Manager, Leigh-Ann Hurlburt. “Merging the Saskatoon Regional 4-H Judging Competition with the Collegiate Judging Competition was an excellent way to bring together youth in agriculture and produce a great event.”

The event concluded on Sunday, January 28 with the Show Judging Competition, where competitors judged a class of four beef animals and delivered oral reasons in front of an audience. “Gaining experience behind the microphone provides our up-and-coming judges with helpful feedback and opportunities to improve their skills,” said Hurlburt.

Event Results

4-H Senior Division – 1st place: Hunter Reid, Rockin H Multiple Club
4-H Intermediate Division – 1st place: Heidi Zoerb, Vanscoy Multiple 4-H Club
4-H Junior Division – 1st place: Carsyn Pochipinski, Saskatoon 4-H Beef Club

Collegiate Competition Top 5
1st place: Chase Bruynooghe, University of Saskatchewan
2nd place: Quinten Albrecht, University of Saskatchewan
3rd place: Carmen White, University of Guelph
4th place: Kylie Willms, University of Saskatchewan
5th place: Cache Schiller, University of Saskatchewan

Show Judging Competition
4-H Division Winner: Tanner Lowe, Viscount 4-H Club
Collegiate Division Winner: Chase Bruynooghe, University of Saskatchewan

Link to this Story

Crop show maintains industry leadership

The recently concluded Western Canadian Crop Production Show, presented by Farm Credit Canada, showcased its unwavering leadership in the industry during its new 3-day format from January 9 to 11, 2024, at Prairieland in Saskatoon. In true Saskatchewan fashion, the prairies witnessed heavy snowfalls and frigid temperatures. However, efficient snow clearance by the City of Saskatoon and Prairieland equipment operators ensured seamless access for patrons attending the show.

The decision to transition to a 3-day format for the 2024 show stemmed from valuable feedback from past exhibitors. Prairieland Ag Manager Leigh Ann Hurlburt noted, “Dropping the half day at the start makes a big difference for many businesses involved. A number of them will be moving on Monday instead of the weekend.” This adjustment is expected to result in cost savings for businesses, with less staffing required over the weekend and throughout the week. Positive feedback received from exhibitors prompted the organizers to proceed with the new 3-day format.

The success of the event hinges on the meticulous curation of the trade show, boasting over 1,000 booth spaces across 250,000 square feet of sold-out trade show space. This year, 338 exhibitors, a slight increase from the previous year, engaged in numerous face-to-face interactions with current and potential clients, facilitating key buying decisions for the upcoming growing season.

The show recorded an impressive turnout of 15,500 patrons, offering the opportunity to delve into various topics at the Nufarm Information Theatre. This year saw an increased number of sessions, with industry-experts from the Ministry of Agriculture, Nufarm, the University of Saskatchewan, Corteva Agriscience, and the Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation, covering subjects such as remotely sense imagery, grasshoppers, weed management, and sustainability advances.

We also welcomed back the Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame as they announced the six inductees for 2024. A formal induction ceremony will take place at Prairieland on Saturday, April 13, 2024. For more information regarding the inductees, visit https://www.sahf.ca/inductees

New this year, show organizers introduced a competition to reward exhibitors who bring their creativity and ingenuity to the marketplace. A panel of real farmers evaluated nearly 20 applications, with the top three finalists presenting their innovations at the Nufarm Information Theatre Thursday morning. Results, announced Tuesday evening at the Barley Bash Exhibitor Mixer, can be seen here: cropproductionshow.com/innovation-award/

The winning didn’t stop there. A progressive 50/50 lottery was held during the show by members of 4-H Saskatchewan. The draw, held on Thursday at 3:30PM, saw a lucky winner claiming over $11,000 in winnings. The remainder of the proceeds will benefit Saskatchewan 4-H and Prairieland Agriculture youth-in-ag programs.

For over 40 years, the show has solidified its status as the must-attend event for prairie grain producers, showcasing leadership in crop science and cutting-edge technology. As farmers seek the latest information and products to help enhance yields and crop value, exhibitors from Western Canada and the United States provide solutions, enabling producers to make informed decisions for the upcoming growing season.

Prairieland’s commitment to agriculture and the grain sector remains steadfast. Organizers extend heartfelt thanks to sponsors, presenters, exhibitors, attendees, volunteers, and dedicated staff, all of whom contributed to the success of the 41st annual show. Anticipation is high for next year’s event, scheduled for January 14-16, 2025, as we look forward to a promising future in crop production.

Link to this Story
The Western Canadian Crop Production Show Maintains Industry Leadership For Prairie Farmers Picture from 2024 Show in Saskatoon at Prairieland

From seeds to success

In 1983, a visionary idea took root and has since flourished into an annual pilgrimage to Saskatoon for prairie grain producers. The Western Canadian Crop Production Show, now spanning over four decades, has not only captivated local farmers but has also become a beacon for global agricultural experts keen on cutting-edge technology.

Written by Traycee Martens, Marketing Manager

The Western Canadian Crop Production Show hit the mark in its inaugural year. Prairieland’s then agriculture manager, Michael Fleury, aimed to attract 75 exhibitors to a new show that would focus on every aspect of grain production, including information on seeding, soil types, input requirements, and equipment. The response surpassed expectations, selling out the 40,000 sq ft Jubilee Building with 12 more companies waiting on a cancellation list.

Market conditions ripe for growth

The show’s fortuitous timing, bringing producers and manufacturers together early in the year, proved beneficial for both parties. Farmers sought concrete answers to their questions, while businesses came armed with solutions, allowing producers to make informed decisions for the upcoming season. The show doubled in size to 80,000 sq ft by its third year, drawing some 7,000 visitors. The Crop Production Show soon became a testament to Saskatchewan’s ingenuity, showcasing products born not only from engineering expertise but also from the sheer determination to address industry needs.

Beyond the traditional tools of the trade, attendees sought to network, gather market information, and explore the latest agriculture technologies. The show’s themes evolved with industry trends, addressing topics like diversification in response to bumper crops, grain marketing, and precision farming. In 2020, supply chain demand and mental health on the farm took center stage.

The changing prairie landscape

The show’s success prompted the expansion of Prairieland’s facilities. By 1994, the show had outgrown the buildings prompting the enclosure of the space between the Wheatland A and Wheatland B buildings, creating center hall. In 1997, the new trade center was constructed and Hall D increased capacity even more — show organizers had no trouble filling the space. Less than 10 years later, the old Jubilee building was demolished and replaced with Hall E, adding yet another 58,000 sq ft. bringing the total trade show area in the complex to over 200,000 sq ft. all of which was easily filled by the demand.

Despite the decline in the overall number of producers that tend to Saskatchewan’s 45 million acres of farmland, the demand for creative solutions to manage expansive operations remained steady, positioning the show as a catalyst for technological advances.

Courtesy of Geoff Wilson

A ground-breaking effect on the local economy

Not only has the Crop Production Show had a long-term effect on Saskatchewan’s reputation as a leader in the industry, it has also had an economic impact on Saskatoon. As far back as 1998, the show attracted enough visitors to garner $5 million in direct and immediate benefits to the city. Hotels, restaurants, and shopping malls all register massive revenue increases during Crop Production Week, starting each new year off in the right fiscal direction.

Taking the pulse of the patrons

Maintaining its success relies on the meticulous curation of the trade show, with every display chosen to help grain growers optimize their yields. Exhibitors value the face-to-face interactions with the show’s highly qualified audience, understanding the importance of connecting with potential customers. The show has become a professional development event for growers, offering a prime opportunity for businesses to showcase their products when buyers are ready to make capital purchase decisions.

Photo courtesy of Saskatoon StarPhoenix

Looking beyond the horizon

As the Western Canadian Crop Production Show continues to help shape Saskatchewan’s farming history, Prairieland’s commitment to the grain sector remains unwavering. This flagship event not only celebrates past successes but also anticipates a future where agriculture and technology converge to drive innovation and prosperity even higher. The story is still being written, with each passing year another chapter in the legacy of the Western Canadian Crop Production Show.

The Western Canadian Crop Production Show runs every January at Prairieland. You can follow the show on Twitter or Facebook to learn more about this year’s show and to find information about upcoming events. To view the website, click here: www.cropproductionshow.com.

Link to this Story

The perfect holiday party this season

When the holidays come around, we think about the family and friends we love spending time with. Hosting a party isn’t just a way to celebrate, for many it’s become an annual tradition. Welcoming those we care about into our homes in the spirit of hospitality evokes feelings of warmth and coziness when the weather is at its worst.

Written by Michael Kirkham, Manager of Sports On Tap

The Christmas season is also synonymous with delicious food and drinks. Showcasing your culinary skills can be a great way to express creativity and indulge in festive cuisine. Over and above serving tasty refreshments, you can make your get-together truly exceptional by developing the perfect cocktail bar. From recipes to simple kitchenware, here are all the things you need to create the perfect holiday bar at home.

The most important equipment you need to make your own drinks at home

To properly serve cocktails, shooters, and other festive drinks, it’s important to have the proper glassware and bar utensils. Start with the basics; a cocktail shaker, shot glasses, a punch bowl, wine glasses and cocktail glasses. An automatic ice maker is also handy so that you can always have fresh ice on hand. If you don’t have one, it’s not too late to put one on your holiday wish list – we’re looking at you, Santa!


A variety of glassware and a few basic utensils is all you need to get started.

Ingredients you need to make multiple cheer-worthy drinks

Your at-home bar shouldn’t be without the classic rum and eggnog, but to be able to make a wide variety of cocktails, you should have a few key ingredients on hand. In terms of mix, make sure you stock up on orange, pineapple, grapefruit, and cranberry juices along with Clamato and some carbonated staples such as Coke and Sprite. As far as alcohol goes, an assortment of favourites will go a long way to making your guests smile. Think Spiced Rum, Crème de Cacao, Peppermint Schnapps, Baileys, Kahlua, Jack Daniels, and RumChata.

Top 5 drinks to mix this holiday season

Clockwise from top left: Spiced Rum & Eggnog, Jack Frost Shooter, RumChata Root Beer, Peppermint White Russian, After Eight Shooter. Get creative with your presentation and decor!

  1. Spiced Rum & Eggnog – the classic!
    Mix 4 parts eggnog with 1 part spiced rum. You can use this ratio in a cocktail glass or if mixing, in a punch bowl.
  2. Jack Frost Shooter
    Mix ½ oz of Jack Daniels with ½ oz of Peppermint Schnapps in a shooter glass
  3. After Eight Shooter
    Mix 1/3 Kahlua with 1/3 Crème de Menthe and 1/3 Baileys in a shot glass
  4. Peppermint White Russian
    Mix ¾ oz vodka with ¾ oz coffee liqueur and ½ oz of Peppermint Schnapps in a cocktail glass with ice and 3 oz of milk. Garnish with a candy cane!
  5. RumChata Root Beer
    Pour 3 parts root beer over ice, then add 1 part RumChata.

———————————

Looking for the perfect place to enjoy some holiday sports over a good meal and delicious drinks? Sports On Tap is Saskatoon’s premium sports bar with over 70 screens and excellent food and beverages. Starting on Boxing Day, don’t miss out on the World Junior Hockey Championship action from Gothenburg, Sweden where Canada will defend their 2023 gold medal finish. All games will be shown live at Sports On Tap!

Link to this Story

Important audio-visual requirements for a showstopper event

Once upon a time, in the not-too-distant past, a clean room with a lectern and microphone were the key ingredients to a great meeting or conference. As consumer expectations have matured over the years, so have the in-house services offered by Prairieland. To meet the needs of our ever-evolving clientele, we have elevated our audio-visual game to help them produce show-stopping events that will be talked about for years.

 

Written by Jay Boechler
Manager of A/V Production, Prairieland

Like our clients, each event is one-of-a-kind. Whether we are hosting a business meeting, an industry trade show, a conference, a banquet, or a live performance, we start by getting to know the event and determining its basic needs. As most event planners don’t understand the technical terminology we use amongst ourselves, we use visuals whenever we can to demonstrate what’s possible. It’s our goal to help them get the best “wow factor” for their budget by offering amazing stage presentation options.

So, how do we do it? We start with four crucial questions.

The four basic Audio-Visual questions to ask

The atmosphere in the hall can be spot on, and the aroma wafting from the kitchen may smell divine, but if the speaker cannot be seen clearly or the entertainer cannot be heard audibly, then ‘Houston, we have a problem.’ We ask four basic questions when designing and constructing our in-house events:

  1. Can the entertainer or speaker be heard?
  2. Can the entertainer or speaker be seen?
  3. Can the entertainer or speaker display their visual content successfully?
  4. Can the entertainer or speaker be broadcast globally or be brought in virtually?

Eventgoers will appreciate the crucial addition of network systems and faster internet speeds to deliver the best results. What was once “A/V” has steadily developed into A/V – I.T. – two separate technical skill sets merged into one for today’s tech-savvy demands.

Stay hidden, let the light and sound shine on the speaker(s) and guests

As the manager of Prairieland’s Audio-Visual Production Department for the last 12 years, the team and I have learned many tricks of the trade that can take an ordinary event and make it extraordinary by harnessing the power of light and sound. Collectively, we have over 150 years of professional experience and we bring that cumulative know-how to the table. To achieve each event’s unique atmosphere, we set up the necessary components and then strive to remain hidden in order to seamlessly execute the technical aspects without your guests even knowing we are there.

The main plenary stage of any conference or convention is the centrepiece that determines the overall look and feel of the event. Level audio paired with balanced stage lighting and large-scale visual components are the ways to achieve impressive results for this type of occasion. Smaller décor lighting is nice in this setting, but lighting proportion is key – you want the stage to pop but the room cannot be so dim as to induce sleep. Your keynote speaker will thank you!

Lighting and colour can transform a space and add to the overall experience.

Most people don’t think of lighting or audio when it comes to trade shows, but you would be surprised how much our A/V production department interacts with such setups. High-resolution LED walls provide opportunities for sponsorship recognition and booth information, whereas digital display signs help attendees find their way around the halls. Again, there is a high demand for strong, secure internet service, which can be integral to the success of a 21st-century multi-vendor sales event.

While food quality and service will always be number one when it comes to successful receptions and gala dinners, audio-visual is now coming in a close second. We treat these sit-down meals the same as a live performance. The stage must stand out, yes, but the entire room must be brought into play to create an inviting atmosphere that welcomes a guest the moment they walk in. In this case, colour is everything. Low ambient lighting gives the lighting design prominence, and this is where we can take a typical banquet hall and transform it into something truly outstanding. By using slow-moving lights, bright visuals, décor lighting, and gobos, we can create an environment that will enhance the experience of the meal making a strong audio-visual presentation almost as important as the food on the plate.

The future of A/V tech for events

Light and sound for the smallest show is just as important as the biggest

Great audio-visuals can greatly impact and improve any performance and these days, audience expectations for live stage shows are much higher than they used to be. Strong, clean audio with balanced, fluid lighting, and video must flawlessly accompany the energy of the music to deliver an entire vibe to the audience. Concerts must be stimulating for the eyes and the ears, therefore more components are being used today than ever before to make that happen.

Planning audio-visual for a meeting may seem basic but it’s still an essential element that requires an even audio level, lights strategically focused on a bright visual surface, and a strong enough internet signal for a possible virtual component. As global communication tools advance, virtual speakers and/or a virtual audience are becoming regular features of modern-day meetings.

Since 2012, Prairieland’s audio-visual capabilities have grown from a couple of microphones and speakers into a fully functioning A/V production department with nine full-time staff members and an additional six part-time and casual technicians. By 2018, our component inventory had grown to surpass the standards that clients were receiving at other venues. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Prairieland made a voluntary pivot to include infrastructure that would allow us to host virtual meetings and live-streaming broadcasts. We continuously improve our facility whenever possible and keep our eyes open for the next level of services that we will be able to offer future clients for show-stopping events of their own.

Showstopper  Noun. A performance or segment of a theatrical production that induces a positive audience reaction strong enough to pause the production for applause or appreciation.

Prairieland welcomes over 1.5 million visitors each year to our convention center in Saskatoon, hosting a wide array of client events and self-produced Signature Events. Our overarching vision is to enrich diverse communities by delivering extraordinary experiences through premier events and world-class facilities. If you’d like to know how we can help make your next event extraordinary, reach out and ask to speak with one of our Client Services Coordinators. You can reach us at 1-306-931-7149 or email contactus@prairielandpark.com

Link to this Story

Can security measures build trust in large fairs?

Every August, Saskatoon’s Prairieland Park undergoes a remarkable transformation, becoming the vibrant playground for the “6 Best Days of Summer.”

Written by Funmi Oyatogun
Director of Signature Events, Prairieland

The Saskatoon Exhibition, fondly called “The Ex,” had its inaugural event in 1886 and has remained a cherished annual tradition for the last 137 years. It’s a cultural cornerstone for our province, offering a routine pilgrimage for fairgoers who relish thrilling rides, delicious food, lively markets, captivating animal shows, and exhilarating concerts. Behind the scenes at Prairieland, we meticulously plan to ensure safety for our staff, community, and 200,000+ patrons. Though safety has always been a core concern, this year, our security program received an unprecedented enhancement.

Introducing walk-through scanners

The prevailing reality is that large-scale events demand enhanced security measures in today’s world, and our annual fair served as a great opportunity to introduce a new and robust security program. Many people now expect security scanners at airports, concerts and, more recently, at fairs. Our implementation of walk-through scanners and metal detector wands played a pivotal role in our efforts to identify and flag restricted items, bolstering our commitment to maintaining a safe environment within the park.

Our security process consisted of a two-step procedure: a walk-through scanner followed by a bag search, in the event that no metals were detected. For those with detected metals, a wand search was conducted. To accommodate families who often bring large bags, wagons, wheelchairs, or strollers, we allocated a dedicated lane, ensuring a smoother entry process for these guests. We aimed for thoroughness without causing traffic bottlenecks at the fair’s entrances. While there were occasional queues during peak hours, fairgoers responded positively to the need for these measures.

Safety as a whole, not just security

In addition to the new walk-through scanners, we revitalized many of our enduring initiatives to enhance the overall safety and well-being of our cherished fairgoers.

  1. Security Personnel: For years, our fairgrounds have hosted a dedicated police station, serving as a command post for the police department ensuring patron safety during the event. This year, we expanded our security team, featuring additional uniformed personnel at the entrances and our trusted ‘yellow-shirts’ who manage admissions and traffic.

  2. Lost Kids’ Program: Our complimentary Circle K Lost Kids’ team equips children with wristbands upon arrival, bearing contact information for their parents, should they become temporarily separated from their groups.

  3. Health and Well-being: Fire and medical services are continuously on standby to address unforeseen emergencies. Numerous water fountains and misting stations are scattered across the grounds to help patrons stay hydrated and cool on hot days.

  4. Midway and Ride Safety: Partnering with North American Midway Entertainment (NAME), the world’s largest travelling outdoor amusement park, we ensure that our fair rides adhere to rigorous inspections, staying current with provincial and national safety standards.

  5. Robust Communication: Hundreds of radios are deployed among staff with dedicated channels for specific concerns, facilitating quick and efficient communication across our vast 136-acre fairgrounds.

  6. Industry Standards for HSE: We uphold industry standards for health, safety, and environmental practices, including food safety, alcohol consumption regulations, muster points, and more. Food vendors at the Saskatoon EX adhere to strict regulations, with regular inspections to minimize the risk of foodborne illnesses. Our commitment extends to cleanliness, sanitation, waste management, disinfectant routines, and chemical control. We also maintain a lost and found service.

  7. Respect: Our professional security officials are not just vigilant but also culturally sensitive, recognizing and respecting diverse cultural, religious, and social nuances to ensure everyone is treated with dignity.

Did it work?

This year marked a milestone in safety at the Saskatoon EX. We are proud to report zero security incidents, injuries, or accidents. Our security program effectively intercepted any potential threats, ensuring the safety and peace of mind of all fairgoers.

The Canadian fairgoer is eagerly anticipating a future where events and fairs are not merely responsive but proactively committed to safety. At The Saskatoon Ex, we take immense pride in our contributions to this vision. Our commitment to safety ensures a future where trust is mutual, service goes the extra mile, and patrons can immerse themselves in festivities without a hint of unease. Collectively, we all play a pivotal role in upholding the standard of safety.

As we look to next year, The EX will continue to raise the bar for safety and usher in a future filled with excitement and trust.


Prairieland welcomes over 1.5 million visitors each year to our convention center in Saskatoon, hosting a wide array of client events and self-produced Signature Events. Our overarching vision is to enrich diverse communities by delivering extraordinary experiences through premier events and world-class facilities.

Link to this Story

Prairieland adjourns professional soccer stadium

The Board of Directors at Prairieland, in agreement with Living Sky Sports, have determined that, at this time, it is judicious for all parties involved to adjourn Saskatoon’s proposed professional soccer project.

“With ventures of this magnitude, it is important to adjust to constantly changing economic factors,” says Prairieland CEO Dan Kemppainen. “As we progressed with the project plans, we have had to make the decision to attend to competing financial priorities.” The Corporation continues to support the development of all forms of recreation that bring growth to the City.

The Board and Management at Prairieland are thankful for the durable partnerships that have been built over the past 137 years. Established in 1886, Prairieland is the longest-running corporation in the City of Saskatoon and this longevity is a testament to the principles of fiscal prudence and practical judgment. Prairieland will continue to channel energy towards improving and expanding the core programs that align with the roots of the corporation, and the direction that the community is growing.

Link to this Story

138th annual fair comes to a close

Day 6 sets new Sunday record

A new Sunday attendance record was set on Day Six of the 138th annual Saskatoon EX with 39,008 people through the gates. Cooler temperatures earlier in the week contributed to smaller crowds but Sunday’s warm-weather forecast, and the promise of the fan-favourite Crash ‘N Bash Demolition Derby, enticed families to the park for the final day of the fair.

The full-week attendance numbers came in at 207,046. Prairieland is grateful to all the patrons who chose to come and Play the Day Away with us this summer. We are equally grateful for
the amazing group of sponsors, volunteers, vendors, exhibitors, supporters, and staff members. Each one plays such an integral role in the success of our fair.

While we reflect on the 138th annual show now completed, we are already looking ahead and anticipating a great turnout for the 139th annual fair coming August 6-11, 2024.

Link to this Story

RCMP Musical Ride comes to Prairieland

The spectacular RCMP Musical Ride will arrive in Saskatoon July 15 & 16, 2023 to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Two afternoon performances will take place at the Prairieland Grandstand at 2:00 pm both days, with gates opening at 1:00 pm.

With RCMP150 on the horizon, the Musical Ride is taking its world-famous show across the country. Don’t miss this summer spectacle starring the RCMP Musical Ride. A troop of police officers and their horses delight audiences with a truly spectacular showcase of equestrian skill through a formations and cavalry drills set to upbeat music.

The always fun and loveable SuperDogs™ will serve as the opening act for the Musical Ride, delighting all ages with their all-Canadian cast, all-Canadian music, and even some Canadian breeds come together for CanaDogs – a fun and furry celebration that will have you laughing and cheering on the world’s most amazing dogs.

Link to this Story
RCMP Musical Ride Featured Image - RCMP on horses 2023